Broiled eggs with kale and roasted squash

Clean out the veggie drawer with this easy dish. Cheesy eggs served with wilted kale and roasted squash make an easy week-day dinner, or an inventive brunch idea for the weekend.

In Praise of Leftovers
Break out that cast-iron skillet and the broiler setting on your oven. Crack four eggs directly in the skillet, over the kale and squash, then broil the whole dish until everything bubbles.

With the arrival of fall came rivers of rain out my window. I think Puget Sounders are a little relieved after having been through 80 days without rain this summer. So much sun was too good to be true. Now we can go back to feeling sorry for ourselves and coming up with every conceivable use for pumpkins.

I got the most beautiful Kabocha (or Japanese Pumpkin) squash at Joe's Garden before it closed for the season. I peeled and thinly sliced it, drizzled it with olive oil and salt, and roasted the slices at 425 degrees F. until they were tender, about 12 minutes. I then used it for a million things, including a galette and these eggs.

And that's what I recommend for those inhospitable squash, sitting in your pantry or on your porch and staring you down. If you roast it up (there's a good method here) and put it in the fridge, all of the sudden it will be in your eggs, squished between bread with cheese and grilled, or tossed into pasta. 

Broiled eggs with kale and roasted Kabocha
Serves 2

Turn broiler on. Sauté several handfuls of washed and chopped kale in an ovenproof skillet with olive oil and a little garlic and salt. Cook until halfway wilted.

Add a handful of your roasted squash and a squeeze of lemon juice and a bit of grated lemon zest. Stir.

Crack four eggs over the top of the kale and squash mixture, and top with feta, sharp cheddar, or other cheese. Add some chopped fresh herbs if you want (parlsey, rosemary, thyme, or cilantro.) Cook until eggs are set a bit, then transfer to to the broiler.

Broil until everything is bubbling and eggs are cooked to your liking. Cut around eggs with a small spatula and serve, or just eat right out of the pan by yourself or with your friend or sweetie.

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