Rhubarb johnnycake

A simple yet scrumptious cake using the first rhubarb of spring.

The Garden of Eating
Rhubarb johnnycake.
The Garden of Eating
Chopped rhubarb.

I can barely even keep track of all the wonderful rhubarb recipes I've seen lately.

From this amazingly inspirational round-up on Punk Domestics to several recipes in Marisa McLellan's brand-new cookbook, Food in Jars (including pickled rhubarb stalks – doesn't that sound interesting?), to this gorgeous rhubarb crusted crumb pie from Apt. 2B Baking Co. and this uber comforting milk and honey pudding with stewed rhubarb from Autumn Makes & Does, I've been thoroughly overwhelmed by good ideas.

There are so many that I've been at a loss as to where to begin.

But then I saw this recipe for rhubarb johnnycake pop up on The Hudson Valley Food Network's Seasonal Eating page and I sprang into action! You see, I have been wanting to make this simple yet scrumptious cake since I tasted it at the Woodstock Farm Festival committee meeting a few weeks ago. 

The recipe comes from Cheryl Pfaff, an excellent local cook and caterer who has served as the farmer's market manager here in Woodstock for the last few years. Check out her blog, At The Farmer's Market for tons of mouth-watering recipes that feature local, seasonal ingredients. My only complaint was that she did not make two of these cakes since we were fighting over the slices at the meeting....

As John Hodgman would say, "You're welcome." Enjoy.

Rhubarb Johnnycake
By Cheryl Pfaff of At The Farmer's Market

2 cups sliced rhubarb
3 tablespoons raw sugar
1/4 teaspoons ground ginger
1 cup corn flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup raw sugar
1 stick of unsalted butter – softened
2 eggs (use local, free range, organic if you can get 'em)
2 tablespoons sour cream
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. and grease a 9” springform pan.

Toss the sliced rhubarb with 3 tablespoons of sugar and the ginger. Set aside.In another bowl, whisk together the corn flour, baking powder, and salt.

In a separate bowl, beat 1/2 cup sugar with the butter until creamy. Beat in the eggs, sour cream and vanilla.

Add the corn flour mixture to the butter mixture and stir just enough to combine. Pour the batter into the cake pan. Arrange the rhubarb slices on top of the batter and sprinkle the top with a little sugar.

Bake for 45 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack. Slice and serve. Goes great with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

Related post on The Garden of Eating: Apple Bundt Cake 

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