15 recipes for National Chocolate Cake Day (Jan. 27)

National Chocolate Cake Day is celebrated on Jan. 27. Here is a collection of decadent recipes from Stir It Up! to find a chocolate cake that's just right for you.

NEWSCOM
DESSERT: This chocolate cake recipe features white frosting for those who don't want chocolate.

1. Flourless chocolate cake

Eat. Run. Read.
Because the egg whites are beaten and folded in, this chocolate fallen cake puffs up and is almost spongey around the edges.

 By Mollie Zapata, Eat. Run. Read.

10 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate (61%–72% cacao), coarsely chopped
2 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces, plus more, room temperature, for pan
6 large eggs
2 tablespoon natural unsweetened cocoa powder
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar, divided, plus more for pan

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly butter a 9-inch springform pan.

2. In a microwave safe bowl, add chocolate, oil, and 1/2 cup butter. Microwave for 45 seconds at a time, stirring in between, until chocolate is melted.

3. Separate 4 eggs, placing whites and yolks in separate medium bowls. Add cocoa powder, vanilla, salt, 1/4 cup sugar, and remaining 2 eggs to bowl with yolks and whisk until mixture is smooth. Gradually whisk yolk mixture into chocolate mixture, blending well.

4. Using an electric mixer on high speed, beat egg whites until frothy. With mixer running, gradually beat in 1/2 cup sugar; beat until firm peaks form.

5. Gently fold egg whites into chocolate mixture in 2 additions, folding just until incorporated between additions. Scrape batter into prepared pan; smooth top and sprinkle with remaining 2 tablespoons sugar.

6. Bake until top is puffed and starting to crack and cake is pulling away from edge of pan, 35-45 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cake cool completely in pan (cake will collapse in the center and crack further as it cools).

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