How to experience National Bike Month

May is National Bike Month, and there are lots of opportunities to get outside now and enjoy bicycling in your own town. 

Melinda Martinez/The Daily Town Talk/AP
New Orleans artist Katrina Brees and her assistant Allison Hilder ride Brees' art bike creations near the amphitheater in downtown Alexandria, La., Saturday, May 10.

May is an especially great month to be a cyclist. In the US, the weather generally cooperates. Now is a great time to dust off, or tune up your bicycle and enjoy spring and summer riding.

Want to experience safety in numbers? National Bike to Work Day is May 16, and Washington, D.C. and other cities have declared May 17 to be Bike to Work Day. 

Best yet, the League of American Bicyclists has declared the entire month of May Bike to Work Month. The organization's site lists tons of bike-related events and resources from Anchorage, Alaska, to Tallahassee, Florida, that should make it easy for almost anyone to ride alone or with a group, take a class, and enjoy other fun activities.

Here are just a few of the fun ways you can get involved:

National Safe Routes to Schools is offering a bicycle and helmet giveaway until May 31. They also offer suggestions for biking year-round.

This following is just a smattering of the many events offered in various cities nationwide. Find a bike event or class near you.

Tampa Bay, FL: Bike with the Mayor, May 16.

Chico, CA: GRUB Garden Bike Tour, May 17.

Trenton, NJ: Trenton Bike Tour, May 17.

Honolulu, HI: Free admission for bikers to the Honolulu Zoo, May 18.

Radford, VA: Family Wilderness Road Ride, May 24.

Seattle, WA: Summer Streets Party, May 29.

Of course, anyone getting out biking wants to be safe. The League of American Bicyclists offers these tips for bike safety.

Another great resource for information about bike and pedestrian safety and school biking and walking programs is Safe Routes to Schools.

Enjoy biking to work and school and just for fun!

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best family and parenting bloggers out there. Our contributing and guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor, and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. Susan Sachs Lipman blogs at Slow Family Online.

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