Mother's Day arts and crafts idea: Tissue paper flowers

For Mother's Day, how about making tissue paper flowers with your kids? They're far less expensive than real flowers and far more meaningful and fun. 

Susan Sachs Lipman
The finished product: A tissue paper flower for Mother's Day.

Brightly colored tissue- or crepe-paper flowers make a cheery gift or decoration for May Day, Mother’s Day, or any time in spring and are a great way to fill a May basket. These are so easy to make, and the results are so pleasing, don’t be surprised if you end up creating a whole bouquet.

You’ll need:

Sheets of tissue paper or crepe paper, in a variety of colors, any length
Pipe cleaners or wire
Wooden dowel or cardboard tube from a dry-cleaning hanger
Floral tape or green paint

Wrap floral tape around the dowel or tube, or paint it green and let dry.

Layer 5-6 sheets of paper.

Fold the pile accordion-style (the long way, if there is one), approx. 1” thick, if using standard sheets of tissue paper.

Wrap a pipe cleaner or wire around the center of the papers, leaving two equal-length ends.

If desired, cut the ends into round or jagged shapes to create decorative petals.

Gently separate the layers of paper and fluff them until they are fairly evenly distributed.

Attach the flower to the stem with pipe cleaners or wire.

Note: Smaller flowers make great embellishments for gifts. Skip the stem and tape or tie flowers to gift wrapping or ribbon.

This craft is adapted from Fed Up with Frenzy: Slow Parenting in a Fast-Moving World, which contains this and 300+ more fun family activities.

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