Baby monitors recalled for defective batteries

Summer Infant is recalling rechargeable batteries in roughly 800,000 baby monitor units.

Screenshot from Amazon.com
This image, also shown on the Consumer Product Safety Commission recall announcement, shows the Summer Infant Slim & Secure Handheld Color Video Monitor.

Summer Infant is recalling about 800,000 rechargeable batteries used in baby video monitors because of a burn hazard.

The Woonsocket, R.I.-based manufacturer has received 22 reports of overheated and ruptured batteries, including incidents of smoke and minor property damage.

The hand-held, color video monitors were sold with a matching camera and A/C adaptors at Babies "R'' Us, online and other retailers from about February 2010 through 2012 for $150 to $350. The batteries are about 1 ½ inches tall by 2 ¼ inches wide and are ¼ inches thick, black, and marked with TCL on the batteries' lower right corner.

Consumers can contact Summer Infant for a replacement battery at 800-426-8627 or online at http://www.summerinfant.com.

The batteries were manufactured in China. About 58,800 batteries were recalled in February 2011.

Consumers can also visit the Consumer Product Safety Commission site for regular updates on product recalls at http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/. 

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