Airport wedding for returning US Navy sailor

Airport wedding? Yes, a US Navy sailor married his high-school sweetheart as soon as he returned from overseas duty. The wedding, including 200 guests, took place at the Reno, Nevada airport.

A U.S. Navy sailor told his high school sweetheart he wanted to marry her the moment he laid eyes on her after an 11-month deployment off the coast of war-torn Syria.

Seaman Apprentice Dylan Ruffer got his wish Tuesday shortly after stepping off a plane at Reno-Tahoe International Airport.

Ruffer and Madison Meinhardt, both 19, tied the knot just after midnight under a tulle-covered arch in front of the arrivals escalators. More than 200 invited guests, passengers and others looked on.

"Seeing her for the first time, it was amazing," Ruffer told reporters.

A reception followed in the baggage claim area.

"We were expecting a little wedding in the corner," Meinhardt said. "This is definitely more than we could have ever asked for."

The couple, who met at Chester High School in Northern California, initially planned to marry in October but had to postpone the wedding when Ruffer's deployment was extended, according to KOLO-TV.

The bride inquired about the possibility of an airport wedding about three weeks ago, and businesses and community members quickly rallied around the plan. The Peppermill casino offered a spa package so the bride could prepare, while the Eldorado casino donated a honeymoon suite and limousine.

The airport catering service prepared food for the reception, which was held in a fully decorated section of the baggage claim area and featured a DJ.

"A lot of people were absolutely stunned to see a wedding in the terminal," airport spokesman Brian Kulpin said. "It's not something you see in the airport every day."

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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