Ferris Bueller extended commercial is now available online

Ferris Bueller: Matthew Broderick, the movie's star, reprises his iconic role in a commercial that will air during the Super Bowl. Cars played a big role in 'Ferris Bueller's Day Off' and one particular model has a part in this commercial.

Courtesy of American Honda Motor Co.
'Ferris Bueller' star Matthew Broderick reprises his role as a school-skipping student in the new Super Bowl commercial.

Honda has recently been teasing its upcoming Super Bowl XLVI ad, which features actor Matthew Broderick (sort of) reprising his iconic turn from the John Hughes classic, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. The two-minute long TV spot not only features several shout-outs to the most famous lines and moments from that 1986 comedy, it was also directed by none other than The Hangover franchise helmer, Todd Phillips.

For those of you who only tune in to the aforementioned National Football League game each year in order to watch advertisements like this – and everyone else ready to see Broderick take another day off – you can now watch an extended version of the promo, online.

No need for further introductions – check out the “Ferris Bueller” Super Bowl ad below:

While neither this commercial as a whole nor Broderick’s “performance” are exactly the most inspired things ever, there is something fun about hearing the man recite some of the more famous “Buellerisms” about living life to the fullest. If nothing else, you can at least enjoy catching the number of visual references to the most iconic moments in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off – be it the bit with Broderick staring avidly at a setup in the natural history museum, his constant near-encounters with his boss, or the concluding shot where the actor once again tells viewers to go do something else (now that the show is over).

On a side note – Broderick may not be so convincing a charmer now as he was back in his Ferris Bueller days, but can anyone truly deny the everlasting coolness that is Yello’s 1985 single, “Oh Yeah”?

Sandy Schaefer blogs at Screen Rant.

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