Top Picks: Oscar best picture nominees, the 'Song Exploder' podcast, and more

The GateGuru app could make your flight easier, the movie 'The Eagle Huntress' tells an inspiring story, and more top picks.

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Music background

Song Exploder is a podcast catering to the musically curious. It examines a variety of songs from different genres and features the creators explaining precisely how their songs came to be, which gives listeners an intimate look at the creative process from the genesis of inspiration to the final production – and all the lyrical challenges along the way. Episodes include Solange, the composer from the movie “La La Land,” and Metallica. The podcast is available at http://www.songexploder.net.

Oscars catch-up

Looking to catch up on the best picture Oscar nominees ahead of the Feb. 26 ceremony? Some are still only in theaters, but you can check out others from the comfort of your couch. “Arrival” and “Hell or High Water” are available on DVD and Blu-ray and “Hacksaw Ridge” and “Manchester by the Sea” arrive Feb. 21. You can check On Demand for those four as well as nominee “Moonlight.”

Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

Inspiring women

In Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech for the album of the year award at the 2016 Grammys, she encouraged young women to continue to work hard. This year, the Recording Academy created a Grammys commercial in which young women and girls recite parts of Swift’s speech as they practice musical instruments and dance routines. See the inspiring video at http://bit.ly/grammyswomen.

Flight help

Airline travel usually comes with aggravations, but GateGuru could make your travel day easier. The app has information about the layout of the airport, reviews of the food options, and the estimated wait times for security checkpoints. GateGuru is free for iOS and Android.  

Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Soaring film

The movie The Eagle Huntress tells the story of 13-year-old Aisholpan, who is the first female in 12 generations of her Outer Mongolian family to take part in eagle hunting. Director Otto Bell’s documentary is available on DVD and Blu-ray.

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