Top Picks: the movie 'Testament of Youth,' the album 'The Silver Linings: The Songs of Jerome Kern,' and more

The short documentary 'Food for Thought, Food for Life' illustrates the importance of growing great-tasting food and the many ways of achieving this, Fathom Events presents a documentary about Ed Sheeran's concerts, and more.

Greg Allen/Invision/AP
Tony Bennett

Youth and war

The story of a rebellious British woman, Vera (Alicia Vikander), and her fiancé (Kit Harington) and brother (Taron Egerton) living through World War I comes to DVD with the release of Testament of Youth. Vera, compellingly acted by Vikander, sinks into despair as many of the people who matter most to her are consumed by war. The movie comes out on DVD and Blu-ray Oct. 20.

Art of the times

French artist JR, who, like Banksy, prefers to be the anonymous hand behind his giant black-and-white photographic images that plaster urban settings all over the world, has also directed Ellis,a 14-minute film written by Eric Roth and starring Robert De Niro. Filmed against a snowscape at the abandoned hospital on Ellis Island, “Ellis” premièred at the Oct. 4 New Yorker Festival. Check out its timely message about the hopes and fears of migrant journeys by viewing the trailer atwww.jr-art.net.

Food culture

Oct. 24 marks Food Day in the United States. If you want to explore the intersection of farming and environmental conservation, a good place to start is with the short documentary Food for Thought, Food for Life. It illustrates the importance of growing great-tasting food and the many ways of achieving this. Watch the film at foodforthoughtfilm.com.

Sunny side Bennett 

Jerome Kern and Tony Bennett are a match made in Great American Songbook heaven. The Silver Linings: The Songs of Jerome Kern is familiar territory for the ageless Bennett, whose recent forays into pop with Lady Gaga and others tarnished his patina with longtime fans. Adding sparkle to Kern classics such as “All the Things You Are” and “Pick Yourself Up” is the swingingly simpatico pianist Bill Charlap and his trio. Real songs, real singing, real playing – welcome back, Tony!

Jump for Ed!

Yearning to make it to one of chart-topping singer Ed Sheeran’s performances? Fathom Events has you covered. A film about Sheeran’s concerts will be at select movie theaters in October. It also includes a Q-and-A session with the singer. Ed Sheeran: Jumpers for Goalposts will be at theaters Oct. 22, 24, 25, and 26. For locations, go to www.fathomevents.com

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