Top Picks: The Roadtrippers app, FIFA Women's World Cup coverage, and more

Delta Spirit lead singer Matt Vasquez is rousing on the new album 'Into the Wide,' the app GateGuru eases the nuisance of navigating a new airport or catching a connecting flight, and more top picks.

AP

Women’s world cup

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2015 begins June 6 when host country Canada lines up against China. The American opener is June 8 against Australia; the team plays Sweden June 12 and Nigeria June 16. Fox Sports will carry all 52 games. Download Fox Sports Go to stream games to mobile devices. Visit www.fifa.com/womensworldcup for scheduling, tickets, feature stories, and soccer trivia. The final airs July 5. 

Take the slow road

Roadtrippers provides a different kind of driving directions. Rather than charting the fastest path from Point A to Point B, this free iPhone and Android app suggests the most entertaining route. It points out local attractions, restaurants, and scenic detours along your journey. If a recommendation piques your interest, a single tap adds the new waypoint to your directions. 

Airport speed pass

GATEGURU.COM

GateGuru eases the nuisance of navigating a new airport or catching a connecting flight. Enter your itinerary into the phone app for airline updates, airport maps, and estimated security wait times. Fliers may also leave tips for each airport, such as how to snag free Wi-Fi and the best place to find power outlets. Available, free, on iTunes or the Google Play app store. 

Widescreen rock

Matt Vasquez may not be a household name – like Bono or Chris Martin – but Delta Spirit’s rousing lead singer measures up and then some on the Brooklyn band’s moody and magnificent fourth album, Into the Wide. It is music tailor-made for the widescreen, a sprawling, epic tour through a dystopian American landscape. Its anthemic songs such as “From Now On,” “Take Shelter,” and the indelible title track will leave you a little shaken but glad you shared the journey. 

Water circus

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL

One Night for ONE DROP is a Cirque du Soleil performance to raise awareness about global water issues. It ran only one night at The Mirage theater in Las Vegas on March 20; Fathom Events will broadcast that performance in select movie theaters June 10 at 7:30 p.m. Bonus features include a look at how the Las Vegas show was created. Check out fathomevents.com for participating theaters.  

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.