Adele: James Bond 'Skyfall' theme recorded by British pop star

Adele: James Bond will make his 23rd appearance this fall in 'Skyfall.' Adele is behind the James Bond theme song for 'Skyfall,' which will be released this November in the US.

Joel Ryan/AP
Adele's James Bond theme will be officially released Friday.

Grammy-winning British singer Adele is adding Bond girl to her superstar resume by signing on to write and sing the theme of the latest James Bond film "Skyfall" - her first song to be released since her best-selling heartbreak album "21" - Columbia Records said in a statement on Monday.

Adele, 24, who swept the Grammy Awards earlier this year with accolades in six categories, will release the song on Friday on her official website, to coincide with the Bond film franchise's 50th anniversary and Global James Bond Day.

The sultry singer wrote "Skyfall" with long-time collaborator Paul Epworth. She recorded it at London's Abbey Road Studios with a 77-piece orchestra. Adele said in a statement that she was persuaded to do the song after she "fell in love with the script."

"I was a little hesitant at first to be involved with the theme song for 'Skyfall.' There's a lot of instant spotlight and pressure when it comes to a Bond song," the singer said.

"When we recorded the strings, it was one of the proudest moments of my life. I'll be backcombing my hair when I'm 60, telling people I was a Bond girl back in the day, I'm sure."

The James Bond title songs have become a signature of the films, featuring suave British agent 007 holding a gun in a pose that has become iconic.

Singers who have performed the title songs over the past five decades include Shirley Bassey in 1971's "Diamonds Are Forever" and 1979's "Moonraker," Paul McCartney on 1973's "Live and Let Die," and more recently, Madonna on 2002's "Die Another Day." Jack White and Alicia Keys performed "Another Way To Die" from 2008's "Quantum of Solace."

"Skyfall," the 23rd film in the Bond franchise and the third film with actor Daniel Craig in the lead role, will see the womanizing rogue super-spy take on another mission to save the world. The film will be released in Britain and most European nations on Oct. 26. It arrives in U.S. movie theaters on Nov. 9.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.