Microsoft offers ad-free Bing for the classroom to battle Google

Microsoft goes after Google's dominant spot on the search engine market with an ad-free search engine for schools.

Screenshot of Bing's site
A screenshot from the portal to Bing's new ad-free search engine for schools.

The long-running rivalry between Microsoft Corp and Google Inc is turning into a schoolyard brawl.

Microsoft on Wednesday opened a new front against the world's No 1 search provider by piloting an ad-free offering for educational users of Bing, its search engine that for years has trailed Google.

Under the free program called "Bing for Schools," students in participating school districts will no longer see ads or adult content when they do Internet searches.

Microsoft, which has signed up the Los Angeles Unified School District and Atlanta Public Schools among other school districts, has pitched Bing as an alternative at a time of rising public concern over how Internet companies are tracking their users' every move to target the ads they display.

As part of the program, Microsoft will also offer free Surface tablets and course materials for teaching youngsters about Internet use.

Stefan Weitz, Microsoft’s director of search, said the program would help expose young users to Microsoft products.

"We hope that we demonstrate the quality of Bing to teachers and students and also their parents, and once they see how good it is, we hope to see increased usage outside of schools too," Weitz said.

Bing, with 18 percent of the search market share, has long trailed Google, at 67 percent, according to data from ComScore, despite an aggressive effort to close the gap.

ATTACK CAMPAIGN

Microsoft’s move is the latest sign that technology companies are targeting the education market as a way to reach children who will become the next generation of consumers.

The new Bing campaign, framed in the context of privacy concerns, is part of a broad, anti-Google marketing campaign directed by a team of political consultants including Mark Penn, long-time adviser to Bill and Hillary Clinton.

In recent months Microsoft has ramped up allegations posted to its "Scroogled" website, including claims that Google violates its users' trust by scanning emails to target ads. Microsoft has also backed promotion of a "Do Not Track" protocol that would discourage online ad targeting.

"People just don't think it's appropriate to show ads to children in a learning environment," Weitz said.

A Google spokesman declined to immediately comment.

While Microsoft relies heavily on software sales, more than 95 percent of Google's revenue come from ads, and a significant portion of that comes from its dominant search engine.

JOSTLING IN CLASSROOMS

Google and Microsoft have also been vying to get schools to adopt their productivity software. Google has been offering a discount for its Google Apps suite, which it hopes can replace programs such as Microsoft Word on school computers.

Tech companies, led by Apple Inc, have also competed fiercely to get hardware into the classroom, even while academic studies are divided over the effectiveness of gadgets in improving student performance.

Following Apple, Google in December announced a program to give its Chromebook computers to schools for $99 each. Six months later, Microsoft began offering its Surface RT tablet to educational institutions for $199, a discount of more than 50 percent.

As part of the Bing campaign, school districts whose students use the Microsoft search engine win points, which they can redeem for Surface tablets.

Aleigha Henderson-Rosser, the director of instructional technology at Atlanta Public Schools, said she had no qualms about receiving aid from tech companies. Atlanta schools will not be paid money to participate in the Bing program, she said.

Henderson-Rosser said she will try to rally parents to use Bing to help win Surface tablets for schools that cannot afford the technology.

"I'm seeing it as a community effort to fill in the gaps," she said. "What school is going to turn down tablets for our students?" (editing by Jane Baird)

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Microsoft offers ad-free Bing for the classroom to battle Google
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/Technology/Latest-News-Wires/2013/0822/Microsoft-offers-ad-free-Bing-for-the-classroom-to-battle-Google
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe