Lion kills guide at Zimbabwe park where Cecil lived

A lion attacked and killed a park guide at Hwange National Park, the same park Cecil the Lion was poached earlier this month.

Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP
A lion named Tommy walks through scorched grass in the same park Nxaha the lion killed park guide Quinn Swales on Monday. Cecil the lion was also killed in this park on Aug. 6, 2015.

A lion charged and killed a safari guide who was leading a group of tourists in the same national park in Zimbabwe that was the home of Cecil the Lion who was killed by a bow hunter in July.

Police spokeswoman Charity Charamba said Tuesday that Quinn Swales was in Hwange National Park when he spotted six lions on Monday.

"One of the lions had cubs and they became hostile. Mr. Swales at first manage to scare the lions away but then the male lion later made a U-turn and attacked him," Charamba told The Associated Press. None of the tourists were harmed, she said.

Swales was leading six tourists on a walking safari when he spotted fresh lion spoor and decided to track a pride of lions consisting of two females, two cubs and two males, according to the Zimbabwe National Parks and Wildlife Management Authority.

The collared lion, named Nxaha, attacked Swales, the parks authority said.

Cecil's killing in July by American dentist James Walter Palmer just outside the park sparked outrage in the United States. The collared lions are being monitored for an Oxford University study.

Camp Hwange, the safari company that employed Swales, said the guide succumbed to the injuries on the same day he was attacked.

"He was tracking lions when a male lion unexpectedly charged," said Camp Hwange in the statement issued Monday, adding that Swales was leading a photographic walking safari when he was attacked.

Camp Hwange's Facebook page says it offers game drives and game walks where "game likely to be encountered include all of the cat family, wild dog, elephants and buffalo in huge numbers."

The parks authority said a man who sells curios to tourists was killed by an elephant in the resort town of Victoria Falls, about 100 kilometers (60 miles) from Hwange, also on Monday.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.