Asian tiger mosquitoes: What you need to know

Asian tiger mosquitoes are spreading in the continental US. Scientists warn that Asian tiger mosquitoes bite throughout the day, carry disease, and lay eggs that can survive winter.

Sally Finneran/The Grand Rapids Press/AP/File
Michelle Dann holds a t-shirt outside her home in May 2013. A new species of mosquito was introduced to Texas in the 1980s and has now spread to 26 states.

There's a new pest invading many American towns: the Asian tiger mosquito.

Named for the black-and-white stripes on its body, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) was first brought to Texas in a shipment of tires (which are notorious for holding the standing water that mosquitoes require for breeding), the Wall Street Journal reports.

The bug is worrisome for several reasons: Unlike other mosquitoes, the aggressive Asian tiger bites all day long, from morning until night. It's partial to humans, but also attacks dogs, cats, birds and other animals.

"Part of the reason it is called 'tiger' is also because it is very aggressive," Dina Fonseca, associate professor of entomology at Rutgers University, told the Journal. "You can try and swat it all you want, but once it's on you, it doesn't let go."

The Asian tiger mosquito joins other insects now threatening U.S. residents. Gallinippers (Psorophora ciliata), for example, are a type of shaggy-haired mosquito with an unusually painful bite; they're currently found throughout much of Florida.

But few insects are as effective at spreading illness as the Asian tiger mosquito, say scientists. The pest can transmit more than 20 diseases, according to the Cornell Chronicle, including West Nile fever, dengue fever, yellow fever, and two types of encephalitis.

Since its introduction to the United States in the 1980s, the Asian tiger mosquito has spread to 26 states, primarily in the eastern United States, the CDC reports. The bug is also established in South and Central America, southern Europe, and several Pacific islands.

Part of its success at spreading throughout the world is due to a warming climate, but the Asian tiger mosquito has one other pesky adaptation: Its eggs are tough enough to survive a cold winter, according to Science News.

If there's a silver lining to this story, it might be this: The Asian tiger mosquito is displacing another disease-carrying mosquito species, Aedes aegyptiEvery time a male Asian tiger mosquito mates with a female A. aegyptichemicals in his semen make her sterile, Science News reports.

But this also means Asian tiger mosquitoes are expanding their territory. Experts recommend removing all sources of standing water, wearing insect repellent and covering up with long sleeves and pants to avoid the bloodthirsty mosquitoes.

Follow Marc Lallanilla on Twitter and Google+. Follow us @livescienceFacebook & Google+. Original article on LiveScience.com.

Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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