Nuclear energy: buying local and creating jobs

Nuclear energy creates onsite jobs and brings millions of dollars into local communities each year, Tuller writes. AREVA TN, a subsidiary of nuclear energy company AREVA North America, has a philosophy of buying and sourcing locally whenever possible.

Areva
Operators are trained on how to load a canister in the above-ground NUHOMS® horizontal nuclear fuel storage system at an AREVA TN facility in South Carolina.

Localized labor is more than just our business model, it is AREVA TN’s philosophy to buy and source locally whenever possible, as seen in projects in the works in Pennsylvania and Ohio. Our onsite jobs bring in several million additional dollars to the local community each year and boost regional economic development for the life of the project. For example, projects this year in just Ohio and Pennsylvania total about $30 million spent.

AREVA TN’s operations at each utility generate an additional 25 to 30 high paying skilled jobs. These workers support the onsite construction of the NUHOMS® Horizontal Storage Modules and the Fuel Loading Operations. Workers are hired from the local area including union workers in accordance with local rules and practices.

With several decades of reliable performance in used nuclear fuel services in the U.S., we know where to find quality work, and where to find it locally! 

At an AREVA TN project scheduled for Pennsylvania, skilled work will be handled by Iron Workers Local 3, Operating Engineers Local 66 (IOUE), Laborers Local DCWP (LIUNA), Cement Masons Local 526 (OPCMIA), and Boilermakers Local 154. Across the river in Ohio, a potential project would be handled by our labor network with Ironworkers Local 55, Operating Engineers Local 18, Laborers Local 480, and Cement Masons Local 886.

As a business unit of AREVA Inc. North America, AREVA TN delivers on our company-wide localization commitment and supports the American labor required to grow the U.S. nuclear industry.

- See more at: http://us.arevablog.com/2013/12/06/areva-tn-gets-local-in-pa-and-oh/#sthash.Fl7MjilX.dpuf

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