Readers write: Aiding inventors, story without political motivations, austerity for teachers, thoughtful journalism

Letters to the editor for the July 2, 2018 weekly magazine.

Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik/Kremlin Pool Photo/AP
Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a Security Council meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia on June 21, 2018.

Aiding inventors

Regarding the March 22 Monitor Daily editorial “Trump’s action on China helps all inventors”: I had been unaware of China’s progress toward honoring the concept of intellectual property and of the possible positive impact of our administration’s punishing China for patent theft. This should get more publicity, and I thank you for bringing it out.

Kathryn Price

Pittsburgh

Story without political motivations

The April 23 & 30 OneWeek piece “Is Trump immune from prosecution?” was a great article. Finally, a factually based explanation without any politically motivated intrusions. 

This is what The Christian Science Monitor is noted for! Thanks.

William Bauer

Harrisburg, Pa.

Austerity for teachers

The April 16 OneWeek article “Teachers challenge GOP austerity” is a really important story. It reminds me of the 1950s, when I was growing up and attending a one-room schoolhouse where the one teacher taught three grades on a pitiful salary. I thought the United States had advanced beyond this kind of neglect for our future bankers, explorers, scientists, etc.

Rosalie Dunbar

Dracut, Mass.

Thoughtful journalism

Regarding the April 16 OneWeek article “To Russians, Putin has new mantle”: This article had the typical thoughtful, insightful journalism I’ve come to expect from The Christian Science Monitor. 

If there’s any bias, you would need an electron microscope to unearth it. Keep up the great work!

Kenneth A. Pinette

Amesbury, Mass.

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Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

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