Readers Write: GOP media has nice people with bad policies; US ignores Constitution

Letters to the Editor for the May 26, 2014 weekly magazine:

I don’t doubt that the people at Fox News all are beautiful human beings. I just don’t care for the way they seem to slant the truth to push an agenda or be controversial.

I don’t think the differences in people’s political views should be characterized as Republican versus Democrat. I see the difference as being constitutionalists versus anarchists. 

Nice people, bad policies

Regarding Sally Kohn’s April 21 & 28 commentary, “What I learned as a liberal talking head on Fox News”: I don’t doubt that the people at Fox Ms. Kohn mentions all are beautiful human beings. I just don’t care for the way they seem to slant the truth to push an agenda or be controversial. They are adept at taking a weak point or mistake made by Democrats and then painting it as the issue. When this is presented as the news, I question their objectivity.

Bill O’Reilly may be a prince of fellows personally, but his actions as presented to the public in his program can be mean-spirited. On the other side you have Bill Maher and Jon Stewart. The only difference is that they are primarily comedians.

I would like to be able to either read or hear the news without a slant, where all sides of the issues are shown and I decide what I want to think about it. Sadly that type of reporting does not exist enough on the right or the left.

Anibal Martinez

Garland, Texas

Constitutionalists vs. anarchists

I don’t think the differences in people’s political views should be characterized as Republican versus Democrat or liberal versus conservative or right versus left. The real difference lies in people’s view of what constitutes lawful government. I see the difference as being constitutionalists versus anarchists. We either have a lawfully constituted government created for the purpose of securing people’s unalienable rights to life, liberty, and an opportunity for happiness or we don’t.

Years ago I partnered with the late Gov. Evan Mecham (R) of Arizona in speaking to groups. He rarely failed to cite America’s problem as being the inability and/or refusal of politicians to accept that the Constitution says what it means, means what it says, and isn’t difficult to interpret when viewed in the light of government’s purpose.

It’s quite clear to me that America’s problems stem from a different philosophy of government – “to rein in the rights of the people.” To counter America’s slide away from being a constitutional republic, true constitutionalists must gain control of the federal government.

Walter L. Myers

Constitutionalists’ Networking Center
Bullhead City, Ariz.

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