Stomach problems healed after finding Christian Science

Frequently bedridden and unable to attend school due to various ailments, a young woman yearned for healing. That’s when her family learned about Christian Science – and it turned the situation around completely.

Christian Science Perspective audio edition
Loading the player...

I became acquainted with Christian Science nearly a decade ago when I was very sickly, suffering from a stomach ulcer, stomach pains, and other ailments. I had been striving to earn my primary school certificate, but I had given up hope because I spent most of my time in bed. One day, my father was listening to Radio Congo, as he often did, hoping to find a broadcast on health so that he could learn about new things to try to help me.

That afternoon, when he turned on the radio, he tuned directly to a Christian Science broadcast. During the program the presenter shared that he had not taken any medicine for several years, because he found healing in the one true Mind, God.

This was a revolutionary idea to my father, and he wanted to know more. He called the number provided on the broadcast to find out more about Christian Science, and he learned that there were some branch Churches of Christ, Scientist, close to us. He also learned about Christian Science practitioners, people who dedicate their time to praying for those in situations such as mine.

Because of my ailments, I was unable to leave the house, but my dad and one of my brothers went to one of the churches. When they arrived, someone there recognized my father, who had been his teacher in school. He introduced my father to a practitioner, who talked with them further about Christian Science and gave them a copy of The Herald of Christian Science, which had testimonies from people who had been healed of stomach ulcers.

I read the Herald, which gave me encouragement that I too could be healed, and I did not hesitate to pursue Christian Science treatment. I contacted the practitioner, who shared with me citations from the Bible and the Christian Science textbook, “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures” by Mary Baker Eddy. At first, I felt reading all these passages was boring. But as the days went by, things changed.

I really loved this passage from the Bible: “Because thou hast made the Lord, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation; there shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling” (Psalms 91:9, 10). This helped me see that no sickness, no bad thoughts, no aggressive suggestions that I was vulnerable, could invade my true consciousness to frighten and discourage me. God, the one true Mind, was there to protect and sustain me at every moment.

Little by little my unhealthy appearance changed to that of a strong and healthy person. By the end of a few weeks I was feeling extremely well, and the ailments did not return.

It was then that I, along with my parents and two of my brothers, began attending the Christian Science church. At first I was not very enthusiastic, despite my healing, but over time I came to love what I was learning in Sunday School: that we can turn completely to God for solutions to all problems, that God loves us all, that He does not choose some to bless and others not to bless as I had believed before. God is always sustaining us, there to guide our steps, and we can trust in God with all our heart.

As for my studies, I was reassured by the idea that God’s children are governed by God, who knows no failure, and therefore man cannot fail either. Holding to this spiritual truth, ultimately I did get my diploma, which allowed me to go on to high school.

Since these events I’ve also had the privilege of taking Christian Science Primary class instruction, which has empowered my study and practice of Christian Science.

I am sincerely grateful to our Father-Mother, God; to Christ Jesus; and to Mary Baker Eddy, who discerned the Science behind Jesus’ ministry and left it for the world.

Adapted from an article published on the website of The Herald of Christian Science, French Edition, Aug. 31, 2020.

Looking for more timely inspiration like this? Check out the “Related stories” below; explore other recent content from the Monitor’s daily Christian Science Perspective column; or sign up for the free weekly newsletters for this column or the Christian Science Sentinel, a sister publication of the Monitor.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Give us your feedback

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

 

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.