The Mother-love of God

Whether or not our mom is still with us, and whether or not we have children of our own, we are all capable of feeling and sharing the love of our divine Mother, God – tenderly nurturing, encouraging, and protecting.

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Love can seem difficult to define. But God is described in the Bible as Love itself, so I’ve found that’s a good place to start. This divine Love is more than fondness, parental commitment, or strong emotion. Words are inadequate to convey the magnitude of infinite Love, of what it is and what it does for each of us. But one way it can be understood is as the mothering nature of God that encourages, protects, and nurtures.

All of us, as God’s children, are enveloped in God’s mothering love, and are innately able to feel that love in our daily lives. But for a time, I couldn’t see anyone in my life that represented a mother figure to me. My own mother had passed some years before, and I prayed to see the ideal of motherhood manifested more tangibly in my experience.

And then came this inspiration: Be the Mother-love of God you wish to see in the world.

What? Me? I’d never even had children of my own! And yet the message was clear. I was to more actively express God-impelled mothering qualities toward others.

As we let God’s love for Her spiritual children, rather than a personal sense of love, inspire our interactions, healing is a natural result. Our role is to get our sense of ourselves as emotion-driven mortals out of the way, and to instead let divine Love shine through us. Human love, while commendable, isn’t powerful enough to heal as divine Love, the infinitely powerful God, does.

So each day I prayed, “Let the Mother-love of God shine in me so that others, too, will feel this love and experience healing.” This was not a personal ability I asked for. Divine Love is impersonal and shines continuously on all. It is stronger than unconditional human love, which loves in spite of flaws. Divine Love knows us as spiritual and flawless, loving in a way that heals problems.

I began to be more conscientious in expressing God’s love and asking God to help me be the answer to someone else’s need.

One evening, I had a persistent, compelling urge to go for a walk. I had gone only a short distance when I saw someone who looked distressed. Carefully I approached her and asked if she needed help. I was concerned because she wasn’t dressed for the cold, and the temperature was falling fast.

Yearning to help, I really prayed to know what to do. I gently asked if I could walk her home, as she had told me where she lived, and I offered her my jacket. She agreed and took the jacket. As we walked, she confided that she had recently moved to the area and was having a hard time settling in.

Mostly I listened and prayed to say the right thing, which in this case was very little. Meanwhile, I prayed silently to know that God’s mothering love was present and enveloping, embracing, and comforting us both. As we passed by the street where I live, I pointed out my house and said she could knock on my door if she ever felt she needed someone to talk to, and she would be welcome.

When we arrived at her house, she gave me back my jacket, threw her arms around me in a big hug, and disappeared into the house. Since then, I’ve seen her occasionally in the neighborhood, and she appears to be thriving.

To me this was a clear example of how praying to feel God’s love for all equips us to help others in times of need. Even the warm jacket I gave this individual to wear could be seen as representing a loving hug from the heavenly Mother that continuously watches over each of us.

How heartening it is to know that each and every person in the world is included in the loving embrace of God, whose Mother-love tenderly enfolds, guides, and protects Her dear children now and forever.

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Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

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