Elections, passwords, accounts – it can seem that nothing is truly invulnerable to tampering. But considering the idea that our relation to God is, in fact, unhackable opens us up to the divine inspiration and guidance that protect and heal.

Christian Science Perspective audio edition
Loading the player...

Across the world, fears and allegations continue to come to light about democratic election processes being tampered with by foreign interests. Passwords get stolen. Accounts get hacked.

Such situations can make it seem that nothing is truly invulnerable. But as I’ve thought about this, one idea keeps coming to me: There is, in fact, something of ours that is absolutely unhackable. It’s our direct relation to our Maker, God.

One of the Bible-based names for God often used in Christian Science is “Mind.” This divine Mind is inseparable from its creation, or spiritual ideas—which are actually what we all are. Spiritual ideas exist safely within the Mind that knows them and exist as the unique effect of that Mind. They cannot interfere, subtly or overtly, with other ideas.

This means that we’re all capable of discerning inspiration direct from God and of expressing distinct qualities of Mind, such as intelligence, wisdom, and reason. And this is a strong basis for being productive, making progress, and staying protected from deception and harm.

Throughout the Bible, there are many examples of this. The book of Daniel points to the divine Mind’s willingness and capacity to make known whatever is needed. It says, “He revealeth the deep and secret things: he knoweth what is in the darkness, and the light dwelleth with him” (2:22). I read this as a promise that God directs each of us, imparting alertness, wisdom, and clarity, even if we’re faced with an aggressive intent to deceive us.

What is our part in hearing these messages more clearly? We must be willingly alert to our own thinking, according to the founder of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy. In “Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896,” she states: “No person can accept another’s belief, except it be with the consent of his own belief. If the error which knocks at the door of your own thought originated in another’s mind, you are a free moral agent to reject or to accept this error” (p. 83).

This doesn’t mean ignoring or avoiding news reports, social media, or conversations with friends. But as we guard our thinking, if our desire is to let God lead us to good decisions that will bless our lives and those of our fellow citizens, we will be more receptive to that divine guidance.

What about individuals who are involved in dishonest and deceptive activities? While each individual is responsible for their own moral decisions and actions, we all can support each other’s right to choose good by remembering that each one of us has a true, spiritual nature that is responsive to divine Mind, intelligent good, and is able to reject temptations to commit devious acts. When we make a conscious effort to recognize that everyone has an unbreakable relation to divine Mind and ability to hear Mind’s direction, it acts like a light in human thought. It encourages and supports the thought that is reaching for improved decision-making and behavior that will bless instead of undermine.

The Bible includes many powerful examples of the divine Mind’s willingness and power to guide and protect, including the account of the “wise men” journeying to visit the Christ child, Jesus. Upon reaching Jerusalem, the men asked around to see if someone could direct them to the birthplace of the “King of the Jews.”

Herod, the king, felt threatened and angered by the news that this child had been born. He asked the wise men to return to him after they found the babe so that he, too, could go worship him. But Herod’s actual intent was to murder the child.

The wise men found their way to Jesus, but perceived the guidance from God that they should not go back to Herod, but instead return to their country another way. Joseph, Mary’s husband, also received divine inspiration: to take his young family into Egypt to protect Jesus. They stayed there until King Herod had died.

Each of us is directly linked to the wisdom, alertness, and intelligence we need to make decisions that promote progress. In fact, the divine Mind is continually expressing all these qualities in us. Our relation to this Mind that is good is completely unhackable.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.