A Christian Science perspective: Freedom's promise awaits each of us.

From Boston to London to Singapore and beyond, people long to be free from disease, pain, fear, and suffering. Often without realizing it, what they seek is the understanding Christ Jesus promised when he said, “I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth on me should not abide in darkness” (John 12:46). He spread this light not only through healing people of all kinds of diseases but also by teaching others how they too could heal. This was his legacy to the world.

Many people have felt the light of Christ in their lives and have been healed. Through understanding the Christ Science that Jesus demonstrated – the spiritual truth of God and His creation and the laws that govern creation – we too can find healing.

Mary Baker Eddy spent much of her early life struggling with invalidism before she discovered what she came to call Christian Science. In an autobiographical sketch she says that for 20 years she had been “trying to trace all physical effects to a mental cause; ....” Then, at a time when her life was in jeopardy from a serious injury, she discovered “how to be well myself, and how to make others so” (“Retrospection and Introspection,” p. 24). Mrs. Eddy’s growing understanding of God and her love for humanity enabled her to heal hundreds. Her discovery not only restored her health but also revealed the Science behind Jesus’ healing work.

In the years that followed, she endeavored to explain the spiritual basis for the physical and mental freedom that Christian Science provides. In her primary work, “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures,” she states: “Citizens of the world, accept the ‘glorious liberty of the children of God,’ and be free! This is your divine right” (p. 227).

The same freedom is present now for all of us, regardless of age, race, nationality, or circumstances. It involves comprehending spiritually how God has truly made us – spiritually, in His own image, expressing His perfect goodness in every way. This is the promise that awaits each of us. Each step we take thoughtfully and prayerfully will bring us home to the freedom and health that are already ours from God.

Adapted from an editorial in the Christian Science Sentinel.

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Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.