Is education really a worthy investment?

Contemporary education is a dead end. Huge amounts of money — public, private, charitable, debt, savings, earnings — are invested. The output is small, dubious and perhaps even negative.

Butch Dill/AP/File
In this file picture, students attend graduation ceremonies at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Bonner argues that contemporary education is not worth the money put in.

Several of the ‘Capitalism in Crisis’ thinkers — even those who should have known better — thought the government needed to invest more money in education.

Kenneth Rogoff, for example, concludes that “improved education alone will not resolve the flaws inherent in today’s capitalism, but it [is an] essential first step down any path to a solution.”

Oh? We never quite figured out the connection. The problem in a nutshell is that developed countries have too much debt and not enough growth. And their debt is growing faster than their output. How then does spending more on non-productive behavior increase GDP output or decrease debt?

Contemporary education is a dead end. The industry has been taken over by zombies. Huge amounts of money — public, private, charitable, debt, savings, earnings — are invested. The output is small, dubious and perhaps even negative.

We know that in some fields, such as economics, the more instruction a person has, the less he knows. Economics — as taught in many universities — is a value-subtracting discipline. As to other fields — politics, sociology, literature, gender studies — we are suspicious.

We have also noted that despite huge increases in per capita, inflation adjusted spending over the last 40 years, test scores have not increased. This suggests that the money was wasted.

But our suspicions run deeper. We suspect that — outside science and engineering — most education, from the first grade to a PhD, is at best a costly luxury…at worst, a big waste of time and money.

Here is evidence, a letter from a former slave to his former master, written only a few years after the War Between the States came to an end. We don’t know, but it is unlikely the former slave had any formal education. But you will notice that today’s typical university graduate could not match his clear thinking or his polite, funny, sarcastic style:

Dayton, Ohio,
 August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy — the folks call her Mrs. Anderson — and the children — Milly, Jane, and Grundy — go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve — and die, if it come to that — than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson

Regards,

Bill Bonner
 for The Daily Reckoning

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