Columbus Day sales: What to buy this weekend

Twenty deals to snatch up for the Columbus Day holiday.

Gene J. Puskar/AP/File
An employee walks past a display of appliances at a Home Depot in Robinson Township, Pa. Columbus Day weekend is a great time to buy appliances, because manufacturers discount the older models in order to clear out their inventory for the new year.

Welcome to America, everyone! For every pointless holiday we have, you can bet there's a sale to go along with it. This month, our holiday du-jour is Columbus Day, but what kinds of deals will you actually find this weekend?

To find out, we asked our team of deal experts what kinds of things shoppers should keep an eye out for. Here are 20 deals to snatch up for the holiday:

Shoes

Keep those toes cozy and fashion-forward throughout the fall and winter months. Columbus Day sales are a great time to stock up on all your favorite seasonal styles. Here are our favorite Columbus Day shoe deals:

Electronics

While we don't expect to see any deals on electronics as crazy as what's set to happen during Black Friday, if you're in need of some tech gear right now, it's not a bad weekend to buy it.

Appliances

Kitchen and household appliances are always available at a good discount during the fall, because manufacturers are introducing new products. They discount the older models in order to clear out their inventory for the new year.

Jewelry

If you're looking to adorn yourself, or that special someone, with jewels this holiday season, now is a good time to save on jewelry!

Mattresses/Bedroom Accessories

Sleep tight all winter long knowing you got a good deal on your mattress, sheets and bed frame at Columbus Day sales.

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