Amazon Dash: Press a button, place an order

Amazon Dash, rolled out Tuesday, is a physical button with adhesive and a hook bearing the logo of a particular product. Available to Amazon Prime members, Dash lets the user simply press the button to place an order for that product to be delivered with free two-day shipping.

A new piece of hardware from Amazon lets users order everyday household items with the single press of a button.

Amazon Dash, rolled out Tuesday, is a physical button with adhesive and a hook bearing the logo of a particular product. On the website for the service, Tide, Bounty, Maxwell House and SmartWater are among the popular brand names featured.

Available to Amazon Prime members, Dash lets the user simply press the button to place an order for that product to be delivered with free two-day shipping.

“Keep Dash Button handy in the kitchen, bath, laundry, or anywhere you store your favorite products,” the Dash site reads. “When you’re running low, simply press Dash Button, and Amazon quickly delivers household favorites so you can skip the last-minute trip to the store.”

Detergent, moisturizer, baby formula, diapers and toilet paper are among the productslisted as being available through Dash — alongside energy bars, bottled water, dog treats and others.

Amazon says Dash is a limited-time offer. Eligible Prime members in the United States will receive an email about the service. They have seven days from receipt of the email to order the buttons.

Each customer may order up to three Dash buttons.

The Dash button is part of Amazon’s Dash Replenishment Service, which aims to have Amazon buttons built directly into devices. So, for example, users of a connected coffee maker would be able to tap a button on it whenever they were running low on java, and the next bag or can would be on the way.

The system also would make some orders automatic. For instance, an automatic dog-food dispenser would sense when food was running low and place an order for more all by itself.

Whirlpool, Brita and Brother are among the companies that have already made devices using the Dash system. They are expected to launch this fall.

Doug Gross is a staff writer covering personal finance for NerdWallet. Follow him on Twitter@doug_gross and on Google+.

Image via iStock.

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