Thanksgiving deals: Get your kitchen ready for the holidays

Impress family and friends with a decked-out kitchen this holiday season. Check out these last-minute Thanksgiving kitchen deals: 

Melanie Stetson Freeman / The Christian Science Monitor/File
A Thanksgiving meal. Impress your family and friends with a decked-out kitchen this Thanksgiving.

So you've volunteered to host Thanksgiving dinner, but lack the cooking accoutrements to make said meal. We've got you covered with five kitchenware deals that will help you get ready for Turkey Day and the morning after.

Perk yourself up for wee hours of prep work with a $20 coffee maker, save valuable oven real estate with $17 off a counter-top roaster oven, and delight your bleary-eyed guests on Black Friday with a waffle maker for under $50.

  • Refurbished TRU Single Serve Coffee Maker
    Store: TigerDirect
    Price: $19.99 with $6.94 s&h
    Lowest By: $4

    Is It Worth It?: It's Thanksgiving morning and you've got a meal to prepare. Don't make the rookie mistake of trying to cook without first downing a cup of coffee, freshly brewed by this refurbished TRU single serve pod coffee maker. An Editors' Choice pick, this coffee maker will save you $4 and perk you up for those early morning cooking tasks.

    A 12-month UNCS warranty applies. 

  • Oster 16-Quart Roaster Oven
    Store: Target
    Price: $24 with in-store pickup
    Lowest By: $17

    Is It Worth It?: You could bake your turkey in the oven, but then where will you cook all the side dishes? Save yourself some room and heartache by picking up the Oster 16-quart roaster oven. Let this Editors' Choice counter-top appliance do all the turkey work and you'll save $17.

  • Tramontina Cast Iron 6.5-Quart Dutch Oven
    Store: Walmart
    Price: $39 with $4.97 s&h
    Lowest By: $17

    Is It Worth It?: Speaking of side dishes, this 6.5-quart cast iron dutch oven from Tramontina is ideal for baking up delicious concoctions. This dutch oven is, well, oven-safe to 400 degrees, and comes in four handsome colors each with an off-white porcelain enamel interior finish. Best of all, at just $39, this cookware is a $17 price low.

  • Oval Metal Tray with Horn Handles
    Store: JCPenney
    Price: $25.49 via coupon code "FALLAIR" with in-store pickup
    Lowest By: $5
    Expires: November 27

    Is It Worth It?: The best cooks know that presentation is what makes guests' mouths water. Raise the bar for your table setting with this oval metal tray with horn handles. Apply coupon code "FALLAIR" to get this nickel-plated tray for just $25; that's $50 off list price!

  • Waring Rotation Single Belgian Waffle Maker
    Store: Nothing But Software
    Price: $48.18 in-cart with free shipping
    Lowest By: $9

    Is It Worth It?: Get your guests ready for a day of Black Friday shopping with a hearty breakfast of Belgian waffles, served hot off this Waring rotation waffle maker. At just under $50, you can pick up this rotating waffle iron and still have plenty of money left over to spend shopping online after you've sent everyone out to face the crowds with full tummies.

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