Nissan recall includes 768K SUVs for electrical, hood problems

Nissan will recall 768,000 Rogue and Pathfinder SUVs to fix faulty hood latches and electrical shorts that could cause fires. The Nissan recalls affect vehicles sold between 2008 and 2014. 

PRNewsFoto/Nissan North America/File
The 2014 Nissan Rogue. Nissan is recalling 768,000 Rogue and Pathfinder SUVs for electrical problems and faulty hood latches, the automaker said Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015.

Nissan is recalling nearly 768,000 SUVs worldwide to fix faulty hood latches and electrical shorts that could cause fires.

The largest recall covers more than 552,000 Rogue small SUVs worldwide from 2008 to 2014. Snow and salty water can seep through the driver's side carpet to a wiring harness, causing electrical shorts. Nissan says there were reports of shorts but no fires or injuries.

Dealers will inspect the wiring and replace or seal it.

The full recall notice for the Nissan Rogue is below: 

SUMMARY:

Nissan North America, Inc. (Nissan) is recalling certain model year 2008-2013 Nissan Rogue vehicles manufactured March 7, 2007, to November 26, 2013, and 2014 Nissan Rogue Select vehicles manufactured September 23, 2013, to July 2, 2014. The affected vehicles may experience an electrical short in the harness connector due to a mixture of snow/water and salt seeping through the carpet on the driver side floor near the harness connector.

CONSEQUENCE:

An electrical short can cause a vehicle fire.

REMEDY:

Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the kick panel wiring harness connector and will if necessary install a new harness connector and waterproof seal, free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a notification schedule. Owners may contact Nissan customer service at 1-800-647-7261.

NOTES:

Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.

The second recall covers nearly 216,000 Nissan Pathfinders from 2013 and 2014, and Infiniti JX35s from 2013 and QX60s from 2014. The secondary hood latch could stay open when the hood is closed. Nissan says some hoods have been damaged but no crashes or injuries were reported. Dealers will fix the latches for free.

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