Adam Sandler and Katherine Heigl are 'most-overpaid' actors, says Forbes

Adam Sandler dethroned Eddie Murphy for the dubious distinction. Forbes estimated that Adam Sandler's last three films returned an average of $3.40 for every dollar he was paid.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
Comedian Adam Sandler performs at 'Eddie Murphy: One Night Only,' a celebration of Murphy's career at the Saban Theater on Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012, in Beverly Hills, Calif.

American comedian Adam Sandler topped Forbes' list of Hollywood's most-overpaid actors, commanding a high up-front fee while delivering middling returns, the magazine said on Monday.

Forbes estimated that Sandler's last three films returned an average of $3.40 for every dollar he was paid. Katherine Heigl, who starred in the poorly performing films "Killers" and "One for the Money," placed slightly behind Sandler, returning an average of $3.50 per every dollar she earned.

Sandler, 47, the star of recent comedies "Jack & Jill" and "That's My Boy," dethroned Eddie Murphy for the dubious distinction. Murphy topped last year's list, returning an average of $2.30 at the box office for each dollar earned.

The list, compiled annually by Forbes, counts the last three films an actor has starred in over the past three years. This year's list was cut off at June 1, and so it excluded Sandler's buddy comedy "Grown Ups 2," which was released in July and performed well at the box office.

Forbes did not say how much Sandler earned on his last three films. But the magazine said he was one of the few movie stars who could still command more than $15 million per film, on an "up front" arrangement. Hollywood studios in recent years have shifted to paying smaller up-front fees and tie actors' pay with the film's box office performance.

The magazine said it examined actors' pay, film budgets and expenses to calculate the average return an actor brings per dollar paid.

Reese Witherspoon, the star of recent films "Water for Elephants" and "This Means War," was third on this list, with an average return of $3.90 for every dollar she was paid.

Nicholas Cage was fourth, with a $6 average return, and comedian Kevin James was fifth, returning an average of $6.10.

(Editing by Mary Milliken and Jan Paschal)

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Adam Sandler and Katherine Heigl are 'most-overpaid' actors, says Forbes
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Latest-News-Wires/2013/1210/Adam-Sandler-and-Katherine-Heigl-are-most-overpaid-actors-says-Forbes
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe