Chrysler IPO delayed until at least 2014

Chrysler IPO in 2013 is 'not practicable,' according to majority owner Fiat. The company hopes the Chrysler IPO will hit the New York Stock Exchange in early 2014. 

Joe Skipper/Reuters/File
A sign is shown at the Massey-Yardley Chrysler. Dodge, Jeep and Ram automobile dealership in Plantation, Florida. Italian carmaker Fiat said a planned Chrysler IPO will not take place this year.

Chrysler said Monday that its shares will be sold on the New York Stock Exchange when they're listed, but potential investors shouldn't expect that until next year.

Italian automaker Fiat SpA, Chrysler's majority owner, said earlier Monday that Chrysler's board has determined an initial public offering is "not practicable" in 2013. Instead, Chrysler Group LLC will continue work on the offering so it can happen in the first quarter of next year, the statement said.

The shares would be traded under the symbol "CGC," Chrysler said in a government filing.

Fiat owns 58.5 percent of Chrysler's shares, with the remaining 41.5 percent held by a United Auto Workers union trust fund that pays health care bills for blue-collar retirees.

But Sergio Marchionne, CEO of both automakers, has been squabbling with the trust over the price, and so far they haven't been able to reach agreement. Marchionne wants to buy the trust's shares in order to combine the companies.

The IPO would consist of shares currently held by the trust. Last month, UBS AG set the value of the trust's stake at $5.6 billion. Fiat has gone to court seeking a judgment on the price, but the trial date is set for next September.

The pricing process for the IPO might be the stimulus needed for the two sides to reach agreement and avoid the public sale. "I'm not selling anything and nor do I think we need to do so," Marchionne said in October.

Marchionne can't spend Chrysler's cash on Fiat's operations unless the companies merge. He has made it clear that he would prefer to settle the dispute without an IPO, but filed the paperwork for the offering in September at the trust's request.

But Chrysler's profits have been propping up Fiat on the balance sheet all year as the Italian automaker struggles in a down European market.

The Auburn Hills, Mich., automaker earned $464 million last quarter on U.S. sales of the Ram pickup and Jeep Grand Cherokee, its ninth-straight profitable quarter. The results boosted Fiat, which earned $260 million in the third quarter. Without Chrysler's contribution, Fiat would have lost $340 million.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.