Trader Joe's supplier recalls salads, sandwiches

Trader Joe's salads and sandwich wraps from Glass Onion Catering linked to E. coli illnesses in three states, triggering recall. Recall involves nearly 182,000 of food sold this fall at Trade Joe's, Super Fresh Goodsk, and Delish.

Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press/AP/File
Pedestrians pause to look in the Pirate Joe's store in Vancouver, Canada, in August. A supplier to Trader Joe's is recalling salads and sandwiches sold from Sept. 23 to Nov. 6.

More than 90 tons of ready-to-eat salads and sandwiches by a California catering company are being recalled after 26 people in three states were sickened by a bacterial strain of E. coli linked to its products, federal health officials said Sunday.

Richmond-based Glass Onion Catering are recalling approximately 181,620 pounds of salads and sandwich wraps containing cooked chicken and ham, the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service said.

The products were produced between Sept. 23 and Nov. 6, and were shipped to distribution centers in California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Texas. The Contra Costa Times reports (http://bit.ly/1bqp5Z1) the company supplies food to Trader Joe's, Super Fresh Goods and Delish.

The FSIS said it began monitoring a cluster of illnesses involving E. coli O157:H7 on Oct. 29 and then was notified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that California authorities had reported people sickened from eating pre-packaged salads with grilled chicken.

In Washington, three people who were sickened with the bacterium told investigators they ate ready-to-eat salads from Trader Joe's, said Tim Church, a spokesman with the state's Department of Health.

The FSIS says the bacteria can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps two to eight days after being exposed to it. While most people recover within a week, some develop kidney failure.

The Food and Drug Administration has a full list of products being recalled on its website at: www.fda.gov/Food/RecallsOutbreaksEmergencies/Recalls/default.htm

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