Gargantuan Ferris Wheel: Where else but Vegas?

Gargantuan Ferris Wheel: It's not just big, it's the world's biggest Ferris Wheel. Caesars Entertainment Corp. is building the gargantuan ride as part of a $550 million development across the street from Caesars Palace.

The Las Vegas Strip is getting the world's largest Ferris wheel.

The outer wheel of the 55-story High Roller ride is scheduled to be hoisted into place Monday. The gargantuan project is now visible from all over the city, including the airport. Early next year, it will be outfitted with 1,500 LED lights and start its slow spin.

"It's going to be an icon," said Project Director David Codiga. "It's going to be a part of your visit to Las Vegas if you ride it or not."

Caesars Entertainment Corp. is building the ride as part of a $550 million development across the street from Caesars Palace.

The High Roller will be 100 feet (30 meters) taller than the London Eye, which opened in 2000, 30 feet (9 meters) taller than China's Star of Nanchang, which opened in 2006, and 9 feet (2.7 meters) taller than the Singapore Flyer, which opened in 2008.

These giant urban Ferris wheels typically transport riders in large, fixed capsules instead of the smaller, teetering baskets some people remember from childhood.

The Las Vegas ride will take 30 minutes to make one revolution.

Tickets will be comparable to the London ride, which costs about $30, according to Caesars spokeswoman Christina Karas.

The High Roller will also likely have to surrender its tallest in the world title before long. Another monster wheel is looming in New York City, where Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced plans last year for a 625-foot (190-meter) ride on the waterfront.

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Hannah Dreier can be reached at http://twitter.com/hannahdreier

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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