Nissan recall for 841,000 vehicles over steering wheel problem

Nissan recall: Nissan issued a recall for the Cube and the Micra compact car, also known as the March, as a result of a steering wheel glitch.

(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai visitors inspect a face-lifted Nissan March subcompact, also called Nissan Micra, on the press day of the Bangkok Motor Show in Bangkok, Thailand in March 2013.

Nissan Motor Co Ltd says it will recall about 841,000 vehicles worldwide including the Micra compact car, also known as the March, as a result of a steering wheel glitch, Japan's No.2 automaker said on Thursday.

Nissan is recalling certain models of the Micra compact car produced in Britain and Japan between 2002 and 2006, as well as the Cube, produced in Japan around the same period.

It is pulling back vehicles in Japan, Europe, Asia, Oceania, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

The bolt used in the steering wheel of these cars may not have been properly tightened and at worst the steering wheel may not function, Nissan said in a statement filed to the Japanese transport ministry.

No accidents, injuries or deaths have been reported, Nissan spokeswoman Noriko Yoneyama said.

Nissan will fix the glitch by either tightening the bolts or replacing the steering wheel with a new one.

The repair will take about 40 minutes, Yoneyama said. She declined to say how much the recall will cost Nissan.

Last month, Nissan announced a recall of more than 123,000 Altima sedans in the US to adjust the inflation of the spare tires, which could be over- or under-inflated.

About 123,308 Altimas from model year 2013 are affected by the recall, according to documents filed the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Due to a production issue that has since been corrected, the spare tires in some of the recalled cars may have too much or not enough air in them, NHTSA said. In some cases, the over inflation may have been significant enough to hurt the tires' structural integrity, causing them to fail and increasing the risk of a crash, NHTSA said.

Nissan said there were no reports of accidents or injuries related to the issue.

(Editing by Daniel Magnowski)

 

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