Bacon-shell tacos, or Bacos, on the menu at Mich. minor-league park

Bacon-shell tacos: Those who come to see the West Michigan Whitecaps play will have the opportunity to chow down on a Baco, a taco with a specially made bacon shell.

Emily Zoldaz/The Grand Rapids Press/AP
Baco, a bacon-shell taco, won the Michigan Whitecaps (not pictured) minor league baseball team's fourth annual food contest. The Baco will be available at Whitecaps games this summer at Fifth Third Ballpark, in Comstock Park, Mich.

A Michigan minor league team plans to offer its fans an oink-tastic treat this summer.

Those who come to see the West Michigan Whitecaps play will have the opportunity to chow down on a Baco, ataco with a specially made bacon shell.

The Baco was the top vote-getter in the fourth annual Whitecaps food contest, which determines Fifth Third Ballpark's next culinary delight.

The team narrowed to 10 a list of more than 150 fan-submitted menu ideas and turned the contest over to the fans.

The second-place finisher was The Bad Joke, a corn dog covered in cheese with two strips of duck bacon on a bun.

Previous winners of the food contest include Chicks with Sticks and the Declaration of Indigestion. They've since been retired from the menu.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.