2017 Nissan Pathfinder priced at $30,890

For 2017, the Pathfinder includes host of changes, including a new 3.5-liter V-6 rated at 284 horsepower, an increase of 24 from last year. 

Yuya Shino/Reuters/File
The logo of Nissan Motor Co is pictured on a vehicle at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo. The refreshed 2017 Nissan Pathfinder is just now arriving in the automaker's dealership showrooms, where it carries a modest base price increase over the 2016 model.

The refreshed 2017 Nissan Pathfinder is just now arriving in the automaker's dealership showrooms, where it carries a modest base price increase over the 2016 model—just $160 more for the entry-level Pathfinder S with standard front-wheel drive.

That means that the least expensive Pathfinder available runs $30,890, including a mandatory $900 destination charge. On the flip side, a range-topping Pathfinder Platinum with all-wheel drive runs $44,460 before any options are piled on.

For 2017, the Pathfinder includes host of changes, including a new 3.5-liter V-6 rated at 284 horsepower, an increase of 24 from last year (that's a reasonable $6.67 per horsepower, if you want to look at it that way). 

Additionally, for 2017 the Pathfinder sees some interior and exterior design updates, and it now offers automatic emergency braking as an option. All Pathfinders use the same V-6 and come standard with front-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is a $1,690 extra for every trim level.

The Pathfinder remains closely related to the Infiniti QX60, which also receives the new V-6. 

Here's a rundown of the 2017 Pathfinder's prices for front-wheel drive models. 

  • Pathfinder S $30,890
  • Pathfinder SV $33,580
  • Pathfinder SL $36,600
  • Pathfinder Platinum $42,770

At the bottom end, the Pathfinder significantly undercuts rivals like the 2017 Ford Explorer ($32,105), the 2016 Mazda CX-9 ($32,420), and the 2016 Toyota Highlander ($32,915).Nissan says that its dealers should be receiving the updated Pathfinder this week. 

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