Want to own Optimus Prime? Now you can.

The truck that served as Optimus's vehicle mode in the movies will soon be available at auction. 

Paramount Pictures/Zuma/Newscom
Robotic giant and occasional truck Optimus Prime strikes a pose in 'Transformers: Dark of the Moon.' The truck that served as Prime’s vehicle mode for the first three movies will soon be available at auction.

Here’s your chance to become the ultimate hero of pretty much every kid on the planet, and we’d wager a few bigger kids as well.

You can actually own Optimus Prime!

To be more accurate, you can own the truck that was used for Prime’s vehicle mode during filming of the first three Transformers movies.

The truck, a modified 1992 Peterbilt 379, is being auctioned off alongside a classic Camaro that starred as the vehicle mode of Bumblebee in the most recent Transformers movie. The vehicles will go up for auction on behalf of Paramount Pictures at the Barrett-Jackson event taking place from January 23-31 in Scottsdale, Arizona.

In addition to its instantly recognizable paint job, the truck includes a custom front bumper, blacked-out windows, various blue lights and the famous Autobots logo mounted to the grille. Apparently, director Michael Bay was so impressed with the design of the truck and its huge size that he picked it for the movie, even though he knew he’d receive some flak for not going with a cab-forward design as seen in the original comics.

“I’m confident that Optimus Prime and Bumblebee will be a huge hit in Scottsdale,” Barrett-Jackson boss Steve Davis said in a statement. “These vehicles are part of a celebrated global phenomenon and have cemented their place in the hearts of fans who watched them in action on the big screen—the two heroes will be an exciting part of any collection for movie fans and car enthusiasts alike.”

According to the auction house, the truck is a fully functioning vehicle with a proper VIN and an original title in Paramount Pictures’ name. However, it’s officially a stunt vehicle and currently not street legal. It also may not be emissions compliant in all 50 states.

We’re told both the truck and Camaro are being sold without reserve.

This article first appeared at MotorAuthority

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.