Hyundai Genesis Coupes recalled to fix suspension problems

Hyundai is recalling nearly 11,000 Genesis Coupe vehicles from the 2013, 2014, and 2015 model years. Some of those vehicles may suffer from suspension problems that could cause the car's powertrain to fail.

Hyundai Motor America/PrNewsFoto/File
The Hyundai Genesis Coupe, seen here, is being recalled due to suspension problems that could affect its engine performance.

Hyundai is recalling nearly 11,000 Genesis Coupe vehicles from the 2013, 2014, and 2015 model years. According to a bulletin from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, some of those vehicles may suffer from suspension problems that could cause the car's powertrain to fail.

The recall stems from a manufacturing problem involving two very important components: the differential and the suspension rear crossmember. If they weren't properly lined up as the Genesis Coupe was being assembled, the bolts that hold the differential in place could loosen over time, allowing it to slip out of position. 

Should that happen, it could cause the driveshaft and differential to separate, reducing or eliminating propulsion. Depending on where and when that might happen, it could dramatically increase the risk of a crash. 

The recall affects 2013, 2014, and 2015 Genesis Coupes built between December 28, 2011 and April 6, 2015 and equipped with manual transmissions. Hyundai estimates that 10,800 cars registered in the U.S. are affected.   

Hyundai says that it will mail recall notices to owners by January 11, 2016. At that time, owners will be able to take their vehicles to Hyundai dealers, who will inspect the differential assembly and make repairs, if necessary.

If you believe that you own one of these vehicles, you're encouraged to contact Hyundai customer service at 855-671-3059 and ask about recall #135. You can also call NHTSA at 888-327-4236 and ask about safety campaign #15V756000.

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