2014-2015 Mitsubishi Lancer recalled for fuel leak and fire risk

Mitsubishi Motors is recalling 1,500 Lancer Evolution and Lancer Ralliart vehicles 2014 and 2015 models.

Maxim Zmeyev/Reuters/File
Vehicles are reflected in the logo of a Mitsubishi at a showroom of the Avtomir company, a Mitsubishi cars dealership, in Moscow, in this April 1, 2015 file photo.

Mitsubishi Motors is recalling nearly 1,500 Lancer Evolution and Lancer Ralliart vehicles from the 2014 and 2015 model years. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, some of those vehicles may be at risk of leaking fuel and catching fire. 

The problem stems from a poorly positioned brake cable, which can, over time, cause rust to form on the fuel tank. As a NHTSA defect report explains:

"Due to an improper installation of the right parking brake cable on affected vehicles, the cable may have insufficient clearance with the fuel tank, causing abrasive contact between the two components. The coating on the fuel tank could deteriorate from this abrasive contact and potentially allow for rust formation. In the worst case scenario, a pin hole could develop and allow for fuel leakage."

And as we all know: fuel leak = fire risk. 

The recall affects 1,497 Mitsubishi Lancer models made during specific windows of time:

  • 2014-2015 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution vehicles manufactured between January 31, 2014 and September 5, 2014
  • 2014-2015 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart vehicles manufactured between  February 3, 2014 and September 5, 2014

Mitsubishi hasn't yet told NHTSA when it will begin repairing recalled vehicles. When it does, though, it will mail out recall notices, asking owners to take their vehicles to Mitsubishi dealers. Dealers will replace the right parking brakecable and inspect the fuel tank at no charge. If the fuel tank shows signs of damage from coming in contact with the brake cable, the dealer will replace the fuel tank as well, free of charge.

If you own one of these vehicles and have further questions, you're encouraged to call Mitsubishi customer service at 888-648-7820 and ask about recall SR-15-009. You can also call NHTSA at 888-327-4236 and ask about safetycampaign #15V546000.

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