Ford Mustang 2015 EcoBoost: Hear the roar of the chip

The Mustang EcoBoost sports a sound generator, which enhances the tones of the engine. Other versions of the Mustang, including the V-6 and GT,  

Courtesy of Ford Motor Co.
The sound generator on the 2015 Ford Mustang EcoBoost eliminates some of the coarser sounds made by the turbocharged and direct-injected 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine and enhances others.

In a press release for its 2015 Mustang, Ford Motor Company [NYSE:F] product development chief Raj Nair states that the “visceral look, sound and performance of Mustang resonates with people, even if they’ve never driven one.” But in the case of the 2015 Mustang EcoBoost, the sound he’s talking about is more likely to be coming from the car’s speakers than what’s actually under the hood. (ALSO SEE: Jeep Driver Out-Jerks Corvette Driver's Jerk Parking Job: Video)

That’s because the 2015 Mustang EcoBoost has been fitted with an active sound generator, like the one on the Focus ST and many other cars, used to enhance the tones of what would otherwise be a relatively ordinary-sounding engine. The good news is that the sounds you hear in the cabins of other 2015 Mustang variants like the base V-6 and Mustang GT are all natural.

Speaking with Autoblog, Ford engineer Shawn Carney explained that the system eliminates some of the coarser sounds made by the turbocharged and direct-injected 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine in the Mustang EcoBoost, and in some cases enhances it. To determine the right mix, a computer chip monitors torque output and adjusts things accordingly. (READ: 2015 Ford Mustang First Drive)

The feature is integrated with the car’s head unit, so trying to dismantle it, for example by pulling out a related fuse, can disable the stereo. This means that if you happen to upgrade the head unit in the Mustang EcoBoost, your engine will probably sound very different.

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