Range Rover is at full production and still can't build fast enough

The new Land Rovers and Range Rovers are more luxurious than ever -- and in higher demand than ever too. Especially in China. Chinese demand for the cars is growing so fast the company can't even keep up. 

Starpix, Kristina Bumphrey/AP Photo/File
Actor Daniel Craig at an unveiling for the new Range Rover Sport in advance of the New York Auto Show at at Skylight at Moynihan Station in New York. International demand for Range Rovers and Land Rovers has increased dramatically since the release of the new cars, driving prices up in international markets and leaving the company struggling to keep up with the demand.

The new Land Rover Ranger Rover and Range Rover Sport SUVs are lighter, higher-tech, and more luxurious than ever--and they're in massive demand. So much so, that even with production running full-blast around the clock, Land Rover simply can't keep up with demand, which is about 40 percent higher than the company predicted. 

What does that mean for buyers? Right now, there's a six-month wait on new orders of the Range Rover, and a nine-month wait for the Range Rover Sport, reports Automotive News Europe (subscription required).

China is the main driver behind this demand, according to the report, and buyers are willing to pay premiums of up to $80,000--on top of sticker prices that range as high as $458,000 in the Chinese market.

Considering that in the U.S., the Range Rover Sport starts from just $64,495, and the Range Rover starts from $83,545, it seems that high demand in China is a very good problem for Land Rover to have.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.