Toyota recall: 880,584 vehicles need suspensions fixed. Again.

Toyota recall involves 880,584 RAV4 SUVs and Lexus HS 250h sedans because a recall announced last year may not have fixed a safety issue. At least nine crashes related to issue leading to the Toyota recall have been reported. 

David Zalubowski/AP/File
2007 RAV4 sports-utility vehicles are shown on the lot of a Toyota agency in Aurora, Colo. in 2007. Toyota recall of RAV4 SUVs and Lexus sedans, announced Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, are related to a suspension repair announced last year that may not have solved a safety problem.

Toyota recall includes 880,584 RAV4 SUVs and Lexus HS 250h sedans in the U.S. and Canada because a repair announced last year may not have solved a safety problem.

RAV4s from the 2006 through 2011 model years and the Lexus HS250h from the 2010 model year are involved in the recall.

Toyota says if rear suspension nuts aren't tightened properly after a wheel alignment, the rear lower suspension arm can rust and separate from the vehicle, increasing the risk of a crash.

At least nine crashes and three injuries related to the problem have been reported, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. At least 131 owners have complained about the issue to NHTSA and Toyota.

Toyota recalled the vehicles last August for the same issue, but spokeswoman Cindy Knight said the repair procedure in the previousrecall was incorrect. Knight didn't know if Toyota sent out the wrong instructions or if technicians at its dealerships didn't follow the correct procedures. She said technicians are receiving additional training.

Toyota is recalling 780,584 vehicles in the U.S. and 100,000 in Canada. Owners will be notified over a six-month period starting this month.

Toyota technicians will inspect the vehicles and replace suspension arms which are loose or rusted for free.

 

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