Price tag set for 2014 Chevy SS: $44,470

The 2014 Chevy SS will go on sale later this year for $44,470 — making it the automobile maker's most expensive sedan to hit the market. The SS will be a rear-drive, V-8-powered sport sedan.

Terry Renna/AP/File
The 2014 Chevy SS is displayed at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla., in February 2013. The Chevy will set customers back by a cool $44,470.

Fresh off its Daytona debut, and a couple of years past its previous incarnation as the Pontiac G8, the 2014 Chevy SS has been priced from a rousing $44,470.

The price for the rear-drive, V-8-powered sport sedan includes a $995 destination charge, but doesn't yet include the anticipated gas-guzzler charge, which hasn't been calculated yet by the EPA in advance of the SS' gas-mileage ratings.

The 2014 SS goes on sale later this year as Chevy's most expensive sedan, a bit smaller than the 2014 Impala full-sizer but the heir apparent to the excitement left behind by Pontiac, which was shut down in 2009. The SS is a revamped version of Pontiac's former G8, which was itself a version of the Australian-market Holden Commodore sedan, and it's intended to be GM's best shot at the Dodge Charger SRT and the Chrysler 300 SRT.

Standard equipment on the SS includes Chevy's MyLink infotainment controller with free navigation; Bose audio and a year of satellite radio; dual-zone climate control; blind-spot monitors and a lane-departure warning system; a rearview camera and rear parking sensors; pushbutton start; and power ventilated front seats. A sunroof and a full-size spare are the only options.

Of course, the important standard equipment is Chevy's small-block V-8, a 6.2-liter V-8 with 415 horsepower and 415 pound-feet of torque, good for an estimated romp to 60 mph in 5.0 seconds. A six-speed automatic is the only gearbox, but it's outfitted with paddle shift controls.

The SS rides on an all-independent suspension, and has electric power steering and Brembo front brakes.

Sales of the 2014 Chevy SS start in the fourth quarter of 2013.

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