Support US jobs? Then support electric cars, says governor.

Electric cars meant thousands of new jobs in Michigan, says the former governor of that state. While many have criticized alternative energy grants, Jennifer Granhom says they are essential if the US doesn't want to lose advanced manufacturing jobs 'forever.'

Tyrone Siu/Reuters/File
A sign is painted on a parking space for electric cars inside a car park in Hong Kong in this January 2012 file photo. Former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm has penned an op-ed arguing that embracing electric auto technology is essential for keeping high-end manufacturing jobs in the United States.

Want to support American jobs? Then support electric cars.

That's the message from former Michigan governor, Jennifer M. Granholm.

Granholm was governor of the state when $1.35 billion in grants were offered, in order to develop and build electric vehicles and their batteries.

Writing in the Huffington Post, Granholm says that these grants didn't just mean parts, but jobs--63,000 of them, in fact.

"I know the only reason those jobs were even possible is because the federal government, led by our president, made a commitment to battery technology," she writes, "But as we've heard, there are huge challenges facing the industry. If we don't get this right, we'll lose a lot of those high paying, advanced manufacturing jobs. Forever."

She blames anti-Obama partisans and those bound to the oil industry for setting back progress, and holding back growth of an industry in which America could be a true global leader.

Many criticize the tax breaks granted to electric vehicles, but Granholm describes them simply as a glide path to energy independence, jobs, national security and reducing climate change--not a permanent commitment.

Granholm goes on to say, "The progress in electric cars is a true American success story," adding that those wanting General Motors and other electric car makers to fail are motivated by nothing but partisan politics.

The naysayers need to support innovation, manufacturing and clean energy jobs, she explains--and says she feels real pride for the Chevrolet Volt, built in the heart of Michigan.

And her overriding message to electric vehicle naysayers?

"Get over it".

Want to support American jobs? Then support electric cars.

That's the message from former Michigan governor, Jennifer M. Granholm.

Granholm was governor of the state when $1.35 billion in grants were offered, in order to develop and build electric vehicles and their batteries.

Writing in the Huffington Post, Granholm says that these grants didn't just mean parts, but jobs--63,000 of them, in fact.

"I know the only reason those jobs were even possible is because the federal government, led by our president, made a commitment to battery technology," she writes, "But as we've heard, there are huge challenges facing the industry. If we don't get this right, we'll lose a lot of those high paying, advanced manufacturing jobs. Forever."

She blames anti-Obama partisans and those bound to the oil industry for setting back progress, and holding back growth of an industry in which America could be a true global leader.

Many criticize the tax breaks granted to electric vehicles, but Granholm describes them simply as a glide path to energy independence, jobs, national security and reducing climate change--not a permanent commitment.

Granholm goes on to say, "The progress in electric cars is a true American success story," adding that those wanting General Motors and other electric car makers to fail are motivated by nothing but partisan politics.

The naysayers need to support innovation, manufacturing and clean energy jobs, she explains--and says she feels real pride for the Chevrolet Volt, built in the heart of Michigan.

And her overriding message to electric vehicle naysayers?

"Get over it".

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