Bankrupt American Suzuki to stop selling cars in US

American Suzuki says it will stop selling cars in the United States as part of its bankruptcy reorganization. American Suzuki points to poor sales, exchange rates, and high regulatory costs for its decision to stop selling cars in the US.

American Suzuki Motor Corp./PRNewsFoto/File
American Suzuki's 2012 Super Bowl commercial, entitled "Sled," emphasizes the premium features and unique all-wheel-drive prowess of the 2012 Kizashi sport sedan. The US division of Suzuki Motor said Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, that it was filing for bankruptcy and will stop selling cars in the US.

American Suzuki Motor Corp. on Monday filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and said it will stop selling cars in the U.S. as part of a plan to restructure its business.

The company, based in Brea, Calif., is the sole distributor of Suzuki Motor Co. vehicles in the continental U.S.

In documents filed with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in the Central District of California, the company estimated that its debts and liabilities range from at least $100 million to as much as $500 million.

It also said it has between 1,000 and 5,000 creditors.

American Suzuki Motor said it has enough cash to operate during the restructuring and intends to honor all car warranties and buyback agreements. It will work with its car dealerships to help them transition into parts-and-service operations. In some cases, the dealerships will be shuttered, it said.

Once it exits bankruptcy protection, American Suzuki Motor said it will focus on selling Suzuki motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles and marine outboard engines.

It said that it is exiting the car business because of slow sales, unfavorable foreign exchange rates and high costs due to U.S. regulatory requirements.

It sold 2,023 vehicles in October, which was up 5 percent from the same month last year. Its Grand Vitara sport utility vehicle posted a 64 percent jump in sales last month, although American Suzuki did not say how many of them were sold. In May, the last month it provided a breakdown of its sales, it moved 474 Grand Vitaras, while its biggest seller was its SX4 small crossover, of which 1,101 were sold.

The bankruptcy and reorganization are unrelated to its parent Japan-based Suzuki Motor Corp., which intends to buy the American subsidiary's remaining businesses and automotive service operation.

The reorganized company will retain the American Suzuki Motor name, the company said.

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