Keurig sells a machine to make Coke at home

Keurig Green Mountain will start selling a $300 machine Tuesday that makes single servings of cold beverages including Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, and flavored seltzer waters.

(Keurig Green Mountain via AP)
The Keurig Kold machine and single serving pods. Keurig said it will start selling the machine Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015, that makes single servings of cold beverages including Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper and flavored seltzer waters. The machine is similar in concept to Keurig’s brewers, which let people make cups of coffee and tea by inserting a pod into the machine and pressing a button.

Making a glass of Coke at home will soon be possible, if you don't mind paying more than $300 for a machine that sits on your kitchen countertop. Plus an extra dollar or so per drink.

Keurig Green Mountain says it will start selling a machine Tuesday that makes single servings of cold beverages including Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper and flavored seltzer waters. The machine is similar in concept to Keurig's brewers, which let people make cups of coffee and tea by inserting a pod into the machine and pressing a button.

Coca-Cola is betting big on Keurig Kold, too; the world's biggest soda maker owns a 16.8 percent stake in Keurig Green Mountain.

Still, it's not yet clear who will buy the Keurig Kold, which is the size of a very large crockpot. Keurig says the suggested retail price for the machine is $369.99, but that prices could be as low as $299 depending on promotions. Each pod will cost between $1.12 and $1.25 and make an 8-ounce serving. That means it's not really a way to save money, since people can buy 2-liter bottles and 6-pack cans of soda for less, on a per-serving basis.

Instead, Keurig CEO Brian Kelley said Kold is a way for people to have a variety of drinks at their disposal, without having cans and bottles take up space in their homes. Among the other drinks the machine can make are "craft" sodas made by Keurig, and later this year, cocktail mixers.

"It's a premium — it's about choice and convenience," Kelley said.

The idea of making sodas and other drinks at home isn't new. SodaStream International also sells a carbonation machine that makes seltzer and other flavored drinks. But its machine differs from the Keurig Kold.

With SodaStream, people fill a bottle with water and press down on a button to carbonate the liquid. They can add as much carbonation and flavoring as they want. A complaint among some users is that the carbonation comes from a CO2 canister, which needs to be replaced every several weeks or so, depending on how often it's used.

The Keurig Kold, by contrast, is more controlled. People fill the machine's water tank, then insert a pod to create a specific drink, such as Coke. The pods have two chambers — one with the carbonation, and one with the syrup or flavor. The machine makes the drink in about 90 seconds or less, chilling the water in the process.

In addition to its high price, Phil Terpolilli at Wedbush Securities thinks a barrier to Kold's popularity will be that soda is already so widely available.

"The consumer can already can go into a fridge and crack open a Diet Coke," Terpolilli said.

Still, Keurig thinks its Kold machine could eventually be bigger than its coffee brewers, which it says are in about 17 percent of U.S. households. In addition to going on sale on its website Tuesday, the company says the Kold will be available starting in October at select retailers in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles and New York.

Those who don't want another machine taking up space on their countertop might want to wait a few years; Keurig says it's working on a machine that could make both hot and cold drinks.

Keurig also recently branched into home-made soup, as The Christian Science Monitor reported. 

The coffeemaker has teamed up with Campbell’s to create two flavors of brewable soup: “homestyle chicken” and “Southwest style chicken,” it saidin a statement.

Using the soup mix cartridge is exactly the same as brewing coffee from a K-Cup pod, except customers will have to pour the broth over dried noodles. The companies are touting the product as a 70-calorie snack free from artificial coloring or flavoring.To prevent coffee from seeping into the soup mix, Campbell’s has advised its customers to run a hot water cycle through the machine first, according to Fox News.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.