Spinach recall for Fresh Express. Are you affected?

Spinach recall from Fresh Express involves 9-ounce bags in as many as 18 western US states due to possible contamination with salmonella. Customers affected by the spinach recall should throw the product away and call Fresh Express for a full refund.

PRNewsFoto/File
A bag of Fresh Express spinach is shown in this undated file photo. Fresh Express and the Food and Drug Administration have recalled some 9-ounce bags of spinach due to possible salmonella contamination. The spinach recall affects product sold in several western US states.

Bagged salad maker Fresh Express has issued a spinach recall of select bags of pre-washed salad due to possible salmonella contamination.

“No illnesses or consumer complaints have been reported to Fresh Express at this time in association with this recall,” the FDA’s notice reads. “No other Fresh Express products are subject to this recall.”

The recall was initiated after a sample of the spinach tested positive for salmonella under the US Department of Agriculture's random sample testing program. 

No word yet on how many bags are affected, nor which grocery store locations are involved. Fresh Express is a division of Chiquita Brands and distributes products to a wide range of national supermarket chains. 

The affected bags are 9 ounces and, on the upper right corner of the package, have the product code S299B25 and a “Use By” date of Nov. 7. The product was distributed and sold primarily in the western US, possibly in the following 18 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

Fresh Express and the Food and Drug Administration are working to ensure that the spinach has been removed from supermarket shelves. Consumers are asked to throw out the affected product and call the Fresh Express Center for a full refund at (800) 242-5472. The line is open every day from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

This is at least the second bagged spinach recall this year. In September, the Kroger supermarket chain recalled 10-ounce bags of Fresh Selections Tender Spinach sold primarily in the southeastern United States. In April 2011, Fresh Express issued a much larger recall of its 9-ounce bags of spinach. It affected 2,939 cases.

For the full release, visit the FDA’s recalls website here.

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