Kellogg Company recalls Mini-Wheats. Metal fragments in cereal.

Kellogg Company has issued a recall of 2.8 million packages of unfrosted and Frosted Mini-Wheats cereal due to possible contamination with fragments of metal mesh. The Kellog Company says that the affected batches of Mini-Wheats range in size and were distributed nationwide. 

Gene J. Puskar/AP/File
In this July 2012, file photo, Kellogg's cereal is on display at a grocery market in Pittsburgh. The Kellogg company has recalled 2.4 million boxes of its popular Mini-Wheats cereal that may contain fragments of metal mesh due to a manufacturing glitch.

Part of your complete breakfast may have shards of metal in it. 

The Kellogg Company has issued a recall of 2.8 million boxes of its popular Bite Size Frosted and Unfrosted Mini-Wheats cereal due to a manufacturing glitch that left packages contaminated with metal mesh. 

“We have initiated a voluntary recall due to the possible presence of fragments of flexible metal mesh from a faulty manufacturing part,” the Battle Creek, Mich.-based food company said in a statement released  through the Food and Drug Administration Wednesday. “Recalled products include only Frosted Mini-Wheats Bite Size Original and Mini-Wheats Unfrosted Bite Size with the letters KB, AP or FK before or after the Best If Used Before date.”

Recalled packages include both frosted and unfrosted bite-sized Mini-Wheats varieties range in size from single-serve bowls to 70-ounce cartons (the size available at wholesale clubs like Sam’s Club or Costco). The affected boxes have a “used by” dates between April 1, 2013 and Sept. 21, 2013. 

The affected cereal was distributed nationwide, Kellogg Company Spokesperson Kris Charles wrote via email.  So far, no resulting injuries have been reported.

This is the second nationwide recall in just over two years for the food giant, which also manufactures products including Pop Tarts, Eggo Waffles, breakfast bars, and a wide variety of well-known cereal brands. In 2010, Kellogg’s recalled four cereal brands – Fruit Loops, Corn Pops, Apple Jacks, and Honey Smacks – because of a weird smell and flavor attributed to a packaging snafu. According to the Wall Street Journal, Kellogg’s has already spent $100 million this year to fix problems with its supply chain, and the latest recall will set them back another estimated $30 million.

Customers who have questions or would like replacement cereal can contact Kellogg’s can call the company’s consumer hotline at  800-962-1413, Monday through Friday between 8 am and 6 pm Eastern time. A full list of recalled products from the FDA is below:

Kellogg's Frosted Mini-Wheats Bite Size Original cereal

  • UPC 3800031829 - 18-ounce carton with Better if Used Before Dates between April 01, 2013 KB - Sept. 21, 2013 KB
  • UPC 3800073444 - 18-ounce carton with Better if Used Before Dates between April 01, 2013 KB - Sept. 21, 2013 KB
  • UPC 3800031834 - 24-ounce carton with Better if Used Before Dates between April 01, 2013 KB - Sept. 21, 2013 KB
  • UPC 3800046954 - 30-ounce carton with Better if Used Before Dates between April 01, 2013 KB - Sept. 21, 2013 KB
  • UPC 3800031921 - 70-ounce club store carton with Better if Used Before Dates April 01, 2013 KB - July 29, 2013 KB
  • UPC 3800004961 - single-serve bowl with Better if Used Before Dates between 04013 KB - 09213 KB
  • UPC 3800021993 - single-serve carton with Better if Used Before Dates between AP 04013 - AP 09213 or FK 04013 - FK 09213

Kellogg's Mini-Wheats Unfrosted Bite Size cereal

  • UPC 3800021983 - single serve carton with Better if Used Before Dates between FK 04013 - FK 09213
  • UPC 3800035982 -18-ounce carton with Better if Used Before Dates between April 01, 2013 KB - Sept. 21, 2013 KB
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