'The Heart of Everything That Is' finds new life in paperback format

'Heart,' the nonfiction story of the Native American leader Red Cloud, was well-received critically upon its release and has now become a bestseller in its paperback format.

'The Heart of Everything That Is' is by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin.

“The Heart of Everything That Is,” the critically acclaimed nonfiction book by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin about a Sioux warrior chief, is experiencing new life on the paperback bestseller lists. 

“Heart” was first released in 2013 and earned positive reviews upon its publication. The book centers on Red Cloud, the namesake of Red Cloud’s War, which was fought against the United States from 1866 to 1868 and ended with the U.S. forces going to the Native Americans to make a treaty. 

The book received many positive reviews, with John R. Burch of Kentucky’s Campbellsville University Library awarding it a starred review for Library Journal and writing, “Journalists Drury and Clavin (coauthors, The Last Stand of Fox Company) have written a gripping narrative… This fascinating book is highly recommended to anyone interested in the history of the Old West.” Kirkus Reviews called the book “a well-researched and -written account” and USA Today critic Don Oldenburg found it to be “exquisitely told… This historical chronicle is unabashed, unbiased and disturbingly honest,” while Kate Tuttle of the Boston Globe wrote, “[The book] has the narrative sweep of a great Western… [and] a remarkable immediacy.” 

When it was first published, “Heart” briefly appeared on bestseller lists in its hardcover format – it came in at number 19 on the IndieBound hardcover nonfiction list for the week of Nov. 24, 2013 and ranked at number 25 on the New York Times hardcover nonfiction list for a few weeks, including the list for the week of Feb. 9. However, “Heart” is now doing well in its paperback format. It’s appeared every week on the IndieBound paperback nonfiction list since debuting at number five on Sept. 11 and has stayed at fourth place since Sept. 25. Meanwhile, it’s currently at number 12 for the New York Times paperback nonfiction bestseller list for the week of Oct. 26.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.