Will Tom Clancy's characters continue to appear in new books?

Tom Clancy's publisher says 'we hope Jack Ryan and The Campus team can live on.'

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
Actor Chris Pine is starring in the newest film adaptation of author Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan character. The movie is titled 'Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit.' Here, Pine accepts the Male Star of the Year Award at the CinemaCon 2013 Big Screen Achievement Awards.

What is the fate of Tom Clancy's book series now that their creator has died?

Clancy, who died in October, penned multiple bestsellers featuring Jack Ryan and other characters, including Ryan's son, Jack Ryan Jr., and John Clark, a Navy SEAL turned CIA operative. Clancy’s novels have been adapted into several financially successful movies. According to a statement from the author’s publisher, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, the literary world may not have seen the last of Clancy’s characters.

“Tom Clancy left us an incredible group of characters and a truly phenomenal record of fictional plots that sometimes preceded world events,” Putnam president Ivan Held said in a statement, as reported by USA Today. “[Clancy’s new book] 'Command Authority' shows his characters in just the kind of dire world situation that Tom's fans came to expect. And of course we hope Jack Ryan and The Campus team can live on.”

The author had used ghost writers before, as with series such as “Tom Clancy’s Op-Center," which was created by Clancy but in fact written by author Jeff Rovin. So another author taking on Clancy’s characters wouldn’t be a totally strange concept.

No matter what happens with Clancy’s fictional universe, the next months will continue to feature works based on his characters. The last novel written by the author (and co-written with author Mark Greaney), “Command Authority,” was released yesterday, and a movie starring “Star Trek” actor Chris Pine as Jack Ryan, titled “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit,” is set to hit theaters on Jan. 17.

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