'Harry Potter' stamps are coming to the USPS

There will be 20 'Harry Potter' stamps available for consumers.

Warner Bros. Pictures/AP
The 'Harry Potter' films star Daniel Radcliffe (l.) and Ralph Fiennes (r.).

It’s been more than six years since the last book in the “Harry Potter” series by J.K. Rowling was released and more than two since the last film based on the books came to the big screen.

But “Harry Potter” mania shows no signs of abating. As we reported yesterday, the butterbeer beverage beloved by “Harry Potter” characters can now be ordered at Starbucks. And once you finish your drink, you can head to the nearest US Post Office to pick up your "Harry Potter” stamps (available for a limited time).

Twenty Forever stamps, showing such characters as the Weasley brothers (friends of Harry’s) and wise wizard Dumbledore as well as well-known scenes from the books, will become available to consumers beginning Nov. 19.

“In the books and films, Harry Potter's life changed with a letter, so we couldn't envision a more fitting tribute to commemorate the world created by J.K. Rowling and brought to life in the Warner Bros. films," president of Warner Bros. Consumer Products Brad Globe told USA Today, referring to the letter Harry Potter receives via mail, inviting him to attend the magical school of Hogwarts. "We think fans around the world will share our excitement in seeing the films take their place alongside the most significant figures and events in history as part of the U.S. stamp program.”

And even as “Harry Potter” fans sip their butterbeers and apply their “Harry Potter” stamps to holiday cards, more Harry Potter products are heading their way. “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," a movie based on the “Harry Potter” spin-off book and to be written by J.K. Rowling, is in production, and a new “Harry Potter” theme park is under construction in California.

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