J.K. Rowling: Dumbledore 'was the ... hardest to leave'

In a video on 'Good Morning America' celebrating the 15th anniversary of the release of the 'Harry Potter' books in the US, Rowling singles out Dumbledore as the 'Potter' character she misses the most. 

Lefteris Pitarakis/AP
J.K. Rowling also recently released a new novel, 'The Cuckoo's Calling,' under a pseudonym.

J.K. Rowling recently appeared in a video which aired on “Good Morning America” to celebrate the 15th anniversary of her “Harry Potter” series. During the clip Rowling reveals that the character she misses the most from her years of writing the "Potter" books is wise wizard Albus Dumbledore. If he could meet any real person, says Rowling, it should be his author.

“I'm afraid I'm going to be very selfish, and if anyone gets a shot, it's me,” says Rowling. "It's a difficult question and I have mulled it over at length, and I've considered world leaders who may benefit from some of his calm wisdom, but finally decided there's really only one person who should meet Dumbledore and I think that's me.”

She also says that she feels that the character’s lines came from “the back of her head.”

“Sometimes he said things and told Harry things that I only knew I knew or believed until … I saw that I had written them down in the voice of Dumbledore," says Rowling. "He was the character who was hardest to leave for me. He was the person who I'd have come back physically and sit and talk to me. It would be Dumbledore.”

The interview was filmed for Scholastic, the “Harry Potter” publisher, and debuted on “Good Morning America.” (As noted by the website Hypable, it may have been taped originally for a live chat the author did last year but did not appear to have been used during the chat.)

To further celebrate the anniversary of the series, the “Potter” novels recently got a makeover. New paperback copies with covers created by writer and artist Kazu Kibuishi hit bookstores yesterday and are available individually and as a box set.

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